GWT Spotlight: Berger-Levrault

Posted by Unknown - Wednesday, July 27, 2011 at 2:10:00 PM

GWT developers are always curious about who else is using GWT (besides Google), so I plan to post a few short articles spotlighting companies using GWT across various industries and countries. We'll start in Europe, where there is an especially large GWT community in Germany and France. French firm Berger-Levrault recently posted a short article on their use of GWT for HR and financial applications comprising almost 700k lines of code (can you imagine that in Javascript?). According to the article, Berger-Levrault's GWT applications are widely used in the French public sector. Like many GWT apps, these applications are presumably not publicly visible, but illustrate the scale of applications which can be built with GWT. To learn about more companies using GWT, also see the Developer Tools Sandbox from this year's Google I/O.

30 comments:

jdesbonnet said...

Yes, it would be very reassuring to see more real-world GWT success stories. With the closure of Google Labs and other high profile Google projects, it would be comforting to know that Google is firmly behind GWT.

mder_France said...

I would like to see many other projects like this one. The size of this development is unusual and I would like to ask if there are other examples like this one in the world (outside Google of course !) ?

Alexander Orlov said...

Would be really nice if sb. could elaborate why "you can't imagine 700k LOC in JavaScript". I think the browser compatibility issue is not the same as it was four years ago. It would be nice if sb. could elaborate GWT's advantages in using a statically typed language that catches many errors during compile time and not at runtime like JS.

Artem said...

We are heavily using GWT in our projects. Most of them are visible only to our admins and tech support team (so we can't share them).
As a result of success in using GWT in our internal projects we started 2 big external projects. One of them is just started, but we hope that GWT+GAE would be a perfect platform for it. Second still runs on our test server, but we hope it would be completed soon and published to the Internet.
When this will happen - we would be able to share information about how it goes in production :)

Brandon said...

Amazon has been recruiting GWT developers.

Iris said...

Generali Hellas implemented before a year a rating insurance system using GWT, called IRIS

Adrien said...

Rbee Solar, a French company, is a photovoltaic monitoring web app developed in GWT2.0/Spring/Hibernate (80k lines of code).
We have more than 5000+ homes, from several countries, connected through GPRS to our servers from several countries.
Demo access and info on rbeesolar.com

Zack Grossbart said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Zack Grossbart said...

I work for NetIQ and we'd love to talk about the way we use GWT for the products we deliver. We've even released an open source framework for GWT called Spiffy UI (http://www.spiffyui.org)

Unknown said...

GWT is a good toolkit to develop products of industry strength. But we found it seems not ready to develop a
calculation intensive product in debug mode. For example ,for a 50000 loops, the consumed time is intolerable at all because GWT will intercept and insert many debug info into your code. You will press the "Continue" button many times to keep the browser responsive.

But anyway, I like GWT. Here is a demo site in Healthcare domain constructed with GWT.

dicomsee.appspot.com

Enjoy!

mder_France said...

Hope that I will be capable to contact some of you in order for us to progress and eventualy establish more tangible exchanges. I'm really happy to read about you all :-)

André Morassut said...

Nice to see that this work brought some attention and also that other companies trust GWT to build large applications :)

@Alexander Orlov
To elaborate on "you can't imagine 700K LOC in JS" : because when you start a large development, Java resources a easier to find and manage and with GWT you get a one-language technological stack. Add to this the maven support, the GWT designer, the rebinding power, etc... there's a lot of reasons that makes GWT consideration mandatory before going into a nearly million LOC JS project. And let's not forget that even if browser compatibility issues are less proeminent nowadays, GWT brings you nearly and seamslessly to zero compatibility issue :)

To all readers of this post, feel free to contact me if you want to tech-talk, get informations, exchanges experiences...

Jeff Richley said...

If anyone is interested in how the Government uses it, you are more than welcome to contact me.

I run the software development department at a major Naval command. Our app is around 175k lines of code and growing very quickly.

GWT has helped immensely with older browser compatibility and extreme low bandwidth situations.

Miousse said...

We've built our Dexero FD product (an information management solution that help users collect, manage, and share data between platforms) using GWT.

ep said...

@David
would be good if you provide a reference to an overview of companies using GWT (like the Google Dev Sandbox view) so we all can see the trust into this great toolkit.

The greatest value of GWT is not having sexy widgets (dont blame me) nor giving new mature of doing stuff you never could do before, but rather to minimize software development costs, thats why it is really interesting point for software forging companies - maybe google can focus on it.

@Alexander Orlov
you dont have to completely move to GWT, it integrates great into existing landscape

André Morassut said...

@Unknown You said "For example ,for a 50000 loops, the consumed time is intolerable at all because GWT will intercept and insert many debug info into your code. You will press the "Continue" button many times to keep the browser responsive. "

I suggest you get some documentation on "web workers". I thinks your usecase requires separate calculation threads and what the W3C designed with web workers can do that.

mder_France said...

https://developer.mozilla.org/en/using_web_workers

OrNot said...

Hi,André Morassut
Thanks for your advice. Yes, Web Worker might be one of solutions. I would like to use SpeedTracer's GWT implementation for WebWorker. But so far I don't get any example code on SpeedTracer web worker's usage. If not absolutely necessary, I won't ask help from JSNI.Anyway, I have posted a message for getting the usage of speedtracer webworker in GWT discussion group and hope getting google guys's help.

Actually, What I mean in my post is that the debugging is very difficult for the programs with many times loops. For example, it is a very common thing to process a medical image pixel by pixel. For a simple CT image, the resolution is 512*512,so there will be more than 250000 times loops,the time to finish such a processing in debug mode is often very very long. :-)

Many thanks for your suggestion on web worker. It is really helpful.

OrNot

edbras said...

I would love to see how his soyc looks like and what his initial download size is? And what he did to optimize this?

I have 3 gwt app's of which one is pretty large and has an initial download of 375K gzipped (800K unzippted and optimized code for gwt).

I like to merge all 3 app's but the code-splitting left-over is getting too large.
Also see this issue:
http://code.google.com/p/google-web-toolkit/issues/detail?id=6612

André Morassut said...

@edbras
thanks for your comment. You're right, the output has to be managed in order to avoid giving birth to an overweight JS script. Concerning our applications, we can afford a greater initial download than what would be acceptable for a public website, but we had to work on code splitting as before GWT 2.0 our biggest application output a 10Mb+ obfuscated JS file. We implemented a code splitting mechanism that rely on GWT rebinding to define split points at compile time and we currently get an initial download at +/- 1.5Mb and a total size of 11Mb.

Concerning optimization, we did it using the Soyc report to rationalize the application logic in order to maximize the splitting efficiency. One single application represents a single GWT module but contain several "business modules" : given the fact that a user will probably work on a single business module during its session, we refactored the code to break som dependencies and defined the split points around business modules.

Emilio Bravo said...

What do you think the opinion on gwt published in thoughtworks technology radar?
http://www.thoughtworks.com/articles/technology-radar-july-2011#Platforms

From my experience I do not entirely agree with the 3 points.

jdesbonnet said...

For me, I think a good (not perfect) analogy between GWT and hand written Javascript is high level languages (eg C++) vs assembly language.

Sembiance said...

Quote: "almost 700k lines of code (can you imagine that in Javascript?)"

If it were coded in JavaScript, it would likely be a TENTH of that size, or smaller.

Don't underestimate the verbosity of Java.

habeeb raja said...

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jdesbonnet said...

Is the latest Google Analytics UI implemented in GWT?

André Morassut said...

@jdesbonnet I used quite the same analogy with our engineers during our internal GWT training courses :) I stated that javascript was our new bytecode with GWT and the analogy works great if you work with developers used to desktop programming rather than web programming.

@Emilo Bravo: I have the same feeling. See my next reaction.

@Sembiance : the technology radar (see Emilio Bravo's comment) says "JavaScript is more powerful and expressive than Java" and your reaction seems to go in the same way. Sure, closures and other aspects makes JS less verbose for a given set of expressions. In our case, a great part of the logic on the client side is business rules implementation and not sophisticated UI coding. For this reason, i'm not sure at all JS would represent a productivity benefit. Plus the fact you have to know java to implement the server side of the application (i'm talking of a J2EE back office) : it's easier to manage a single-language development platform than hire developers who are good at JS, HTML, CSS and J2EE development.

But i'm really interested by your opinion. Did you work on a business oriented large development project using a pure JS client on top of a J2EE back office? If yes, I would appreciate having some feedback, thanks in advance.

Lyudmil Pelov said...

I actually use GWT for developing portlets based on Oracle WebCenter and works really very well. I also just realize that the Evernote use GWT as well into the web application.

Steven Le Roux said...

In my company (a french bank which provide oem solutions for other banks too), GWT is the default toolkit to developp any webapp. Some are moving from parts to parts, or rewritten. Public Mobile apps have been developped in GWT too (have a look here : Fortuneo.fr )

sahil said...

Hi I am designing a chat sever in GWT...Can any one help me that what I do to send a chat message from one computer to another(ie any code )...and how to create and maintain a session in GWT...

boni said...

We have a state of the art enterprise product suite for Pathologists, Virtuoso 5, built with a GWT front and a Jboss Seam + JEE backend. It's key feature is an image viewer with integrated image analysis capabilities for images as big on disk as 4GB (compressed). Application is built as screens that can be wired together depending on the workflow requirements. Feel free to drop in since we not so far from each other gegraphically. http://www.bioimagene.com/